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ARC Review: Stay Sweet by Siobhan Vivian

Summary 

Summer in Sand Lake isn’t complete without a trip to Meade Creamery—the local ice cream stand founded in 1944 by Molly Meade who started making ice cream to cheer up her lovesick girlfriends while all the boys were away at war. Since then, the stand has been owned and managed exclusively by local girls, who inevitably become the best of friends. Seventeen-year-old Amelia and her best friend Cate have worked at the stand every summer for the past three years, and Amelia is “Head Girl” at the stand this summer. When Molly passes away before Amelia even has her first day in charge, Amelia isn’t sure that the stand can go on. That is, until Molly’s grandnephew Grady arrives and asks Amelia to stay on to help continue the business…but Grady’s got some changes in mind…

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Review

My rating:

pink3

Hi, everyone! I’m back with another review, this one being on Stay Sweet by Siobhan Vivian. This is actually the first book that I’ve read by the author, but the premise sounded sweet (pun 100% intended), so I thought I’d give it a whirl and request it. Luckily, the publisher granted my request on NetGalley and I got a chance to read the book!

When I first started reading this book, I had high hopes for an enticing plot. And while I did like reading the book overall, sometimes, I would get a bit bored, waiting for something big to happen. It wasn’t until the end where big strides were made in change, and even then, readers don’t get to see how it pans outs. Which is okay for a standalone, but in this case, I wanted to see more action than what I got. The diary entries of Molly Meade were interesting, though. It gave readers a bit more history regarding Meade Creamery.

As for the characters, I didn’t really connect with any of them. But I did respect their development throughout the book, like Amelia, Grady, and even Cate. They all start the summer uncertain of aspects within their life, only for it to be more rectified by the summer’s end. I did admired Amelia’s gumption at the end of the novel. It was great to see her find her passion! I think that’s the time when she really shined (at least, for me).

Well, that’s all I have to say about Stay Sweet by Siobhan Vivian. While the novel didn’t grab my attention sometimes, I thought that it was good overall. Has anyone else read anything by Siobhan Vivian? If you did, which of her works would you recommend that I read next? Also, Stay Sweet is coming out this Tuesday, for those of you who are interested. 😉

Have a nice day!

–  Sumaya

I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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ARC Review: Dear Rachel Maddow by Adrienne Kisner

Summary 

Sixteen-year-old Brynn Harper’s life has one steadying force—Rachel Maddow. She watches her daily, and after writing to Rachel for a school project—and actually getting a response—Brynn starts drafting emails to Rachel but never sending them. It’s an outlet; Brynn tells Rachel about breaking up with Sarah, her first serious girlfriend, about her beloved brother Nick’s death, her passive mother and even worse stepfather, about how she’s stuck in remedial courses at school and is considering dropping out.

But then Brynn is confronted with a moral dilemma. She learns that one student representative will be allowed to have a voice among teachers and administrators in the selection of a new school superintendent. Sarah, along with Brynn’s arch-nemesis John, believe only honors students worthy of the selection committee seat. Brynn knows they are more interested in power and perks. Brynn feels all students deserve a voice. When she runs for the position the knives are out and her brother’s memory and her new crush Michaela are shamed. Brynn asks herself: What would Rachel Maddow do?

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Review

My rating:

blue4-5

Hey there, everybody! Another day, another review, and this one’s on Dear Rachel Maddow by Adrienne Kisner! Now, when I first heard about it, I was a bit intrigued with the premise. How many times have I wanted to send a letter to my hero and have it answered? So I could totally relate to the title! And I really wanted to see what would happen to Brynn as the novel progressed.

One thing I really liked about this novel was that it didn’t end the way I expected it to. Usually, this is something I would critique on, but lately, I’ve been finding it works with a lot of standalone novels, especially when there is a lot going on. You can’t cover everything within about 300 pages. And that’s okay. As long as it ends on a somewhat more positive note than the beginning. Plus, it would be pretty predictable if everything I thought should happen in a novel did actually happen… 😉

As for the characters, I’ve got to say that I enjoyed reading about them. From Brynn and her reluctance altruism, Lacey and her brilliance, Justin and his sheer honesty, and a lot of others. Even when Adam and Sarah came into play, I was totally invested in how they would interact with everyone. Did I like them as people? No way. But they did make the plot more interesting, so I’ll give them that.

Well, that’s all I have to say about Dear Rachel Maddow by Adrienne Kisner. My final note is that I was in it for every email in that book! If anyone else is interested, Dear Rachel Maddow is coming out on June 5th, 2018. Thanks for reading, everyone!

– Sumaya

I received an advance reader’s copy from Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review.

Review: Finding Felicity by Stacey Kade

Summary

Caroline Sands has never been particularly good at making friends. And her parents’ divorce and the move to Arizona three years ago didn’t help. Being the new girl is hard enough without being socially awkward too. So out of desperation and a desire to please her worried mother, Caroline invented a whole life for herself—using characters from Felicity, an old show she discovered online and fell in love with.

But now it’s time for Caroline to go off to college and she wants nothing more than to leave her old “life” behind and build something real. However, when her mother discovers the truth about her manufactured friends, she gives Caroline an ultimatum: Prove in this first semester that she can make friends of the nonfictional variety and thrive in a new environment. Otherwise, it’s back to living at home—and a lot of therapy.

Armed with nothing more than her resolve and a Felicity-inspired plan, Caroline accepts the challenge. But she soon realizes that the real world is rarely as simple as television makes it out to be. And to find a place where she truly belongs, Caroline may have to abandon her script and take the risk of being herself.

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Review

My rating:

green3.5

Hello, fellow readers! I’m back with another review, this one being on Finding Felicity by Stacey Kade. Now when I first heard about this book, I thought that it sounded a lot like Fangirl and was pretty excited to read it. While I did enjoy the ending, I wasn’t what I was anticipating.

One of the things that I did like about it was Caroline’s character development, especially at the end of the novel. When I started this story, I was kind of apprehensive of her. I wanted to root for Caroline – I really did – but then I would hear more of her “plan” and would think to myself,”Noooooooooooo…. don’t do that…” As the story went on, however, Caroline turned things around near the end of the novel, which made her more endearing to me. Honestly, I understand why her mother and psychiatrist were apprehensive about Caroline leaving for college. At the same time though, I’m glad she went to college and through those obstacles because I think that was the only way she was going to learn more about herself. Another thing I liked was that there was more involvement from other characters that were well-rounded by the end of the novel.

However, this character development happens mostly at the end of the novel, mainly because of the novel’s pacing and length. The novel itself ends maybe a month or two after she starts college, making me wish it at least ended with the semester. Maybe more development would have been noticeable. Plus, it set a slow pace for me in the first two thirds of the novel; I was just waiting for that epiphany moment to happen. But that’s just me. If you don’t mind slower pacing, I think you’d like this book.

Well, that’s all I have  to say about Finding Felicity. While it wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, I’m glad I got to read another college YA novel, and cannot wait to read more! For anyone who is interested, Finding Felicity comes out today!

Thanks for reading, everyone!

–  Sumaya

I received this copy from Simon & Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review.

Review: Nice Try, Jane Sinner by Lianne Oelke

Summary

The only thing 17-year-old Jane Sinner hates more than failure is pity. After a personal crisis and her subsequent expulsion from high school, she’s going nowhere fast. Jane’s well-meaning parents push her to attend a high school completion program at the nearby Elbow River Community College, and she agrees, on one condition: she gets to move out.

Jane tackles her housing problem by signing up for House of Orange, a student-run reality show that is basically Big Brother, but for Elbow River Students. Living away from home, the chance to win a car (used, but whatever), and a campus full of people who don’t know what she did in high school… what more could she want? Okay, maybe a family that understands why she’d rather turn to Freud than Jesus to make sense of her life, but she’ll settle for fifteen minutes in the proverbial spotlight.

As House of Orange grows from a low-budget web series to a local TV show with fans and shoddy T-shirts, Jane finally has the chance to let her cynical, competitive nature thrive. She’ll use her growing fan base, and whatever Intro to Psychology can teach her, to prove to the world—or at least viewers of substandard TV—that she has what it takes to win.

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Review

My rating:

black4

Trigger Warning: suicide

Hello, lovely readers! I finally got a chance to read Nice Try, Jane Sinner and I liked it. A lot! To be honest, lately I feel like I’ve been liking a lot of the books I read. Probably because I haven’t been able to just go through with some of the books I didn’t like and just end up DNFing them… I wasn’t sure which category Nice Try, Jane Sinner was going to end up in, but I’m glad it wasn’t the DNF pile!

First off, Nice Try, Jane Sinner is set in Alberta, which makes it the first YA Canadian story I’ve read in quite a while. The last one I’ve read was Kat and Meg Conquer the World last year. Honestly, I can never get enough of Canadian YA, even if it isn’t set in Toronto like Me and the Blondes… I just really relished the fact that it was set in Canada!

Secondly, I really liked the plot. The fact that the story was centred around a reality TV show was something I couldn’t get enough of! I love novels with reality TV shows in them because it makes for great drama! So much stuff happened that wouldn’t have otherwise if this novel wasn’t about Jane’s participation in House of Orange (the reality show). Plus, the book never failed to surprise me, either with the competition ideas and the competitors’ strategies.

Plus, I’m guilty of loving Jane Sinner’s perspective and personality. She’s pretty much like me in a lot of ways, which is a main reason why I couldn’t help but root for her and laugh at her shenanigans! But the novel does have its serious moments as well, and I think that the author handled it pretty well. My only issue out of the entire novel is that I’ve never seen Jane in a psych class, but a lot of the novel revolves around that in terms of a project. I kind of found it baffling. That and wanting to know more about why she doesn’t really like Chaunt’Elle.

Well, that’s all I have to say about Nice Try, Jane Sinner! I would recommend to anyone who likes reading books with witty humour, reality TV, and Canada! Has anyone else read Nice Try, Jane Sinner? And if you had, what did you think of it? Feel free to share in the Comments Section below!

Have a nice day, everyone!

–  Sumaya

Review: Seeking Mansfield by Kate Watson

Summary

Sixteen-year-old Finley Price has perfected two things: how to direct a world-class production, and how to fly way, way under the radar. The only person who ever seems to notice Finley is her best friend, the Bertram’s son Oliver. If she could just take Oliver’s constant encouragement to heart and step out of the shadows, she’d finally chase her dream of joining the prestigious Mansfield Theater.

When teen movie stars Emma and Harlan Crawford move next door to the Bertram’s, they immediately set their sights on Oliver and his cunning sister, Juliette, shaking up Finley and Oliver’s stable friendship. As Emma and Oliver grow closer, Harlan finds his attention shifting from Juliette to the quiet, enigmatic, and thoroughly unimpressed Finley. Out of boredom, Harlan decides to make her fall in love with him. Problem is, the harder he seeks to win her, the harder he falls for her.

But Finley doesn’t want to be won, and she doesn’t want to see Oliver with anyone else. To claim Oliver’s heart—and keep her own—she’ll have to find the courage to do what she fears most: step into the spotlight.

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Review

My rating:

blue4

Hi, everyone! I hope everyone’s having a wonderful Monday! I certainly am, since it’s Family Day and I got to catch up on some much needed rest! Anyways, enough about me; I’m really excited to talk about the book of the day! Today’s review is on Seeking Mansfield by Kate Watson. It’s a retelling of Mansfield Park, which I wasn’t sure if it would wound up being a great book, but I took a chance on it since it had mentions of the entertainment industry, with acting, directing and whatnot. I was not ready for how unputdownable this book was, though!

First off, I have to say that I’m in love with how the story was told through our main characters, Finley and Oliver. Readers get to see the world from both their perspectives, getting a better picture of what’s actually happening instead of just one person’s opinion. But out of the two, I honestly thought that Finley’s POV was more raw and well-written, given how she was raised and treated, as well as the fact that I feel it shows an honest character development. Oliver’s not so much, especially since he’s worried about Finley or thinking about her most of the time… Honestly, the only thing I felt was missing from Finley’s story was that she didn’t get a chance to face one particular obstacle, when all throughout the novel, I was really hoping she would.

I also loved the amount of theatre and movie info that was brought into the text. If you’ve read Mansfield Park, you know that theatre plays an important role (no pun intended) in the novel. So it was nice to see it in the retelling in a number of ways. Plus, I think it’s clear by this point that I really like novels that include almost any facet of the entertainment industry, so there was a good chance that I was going to enjoy the book anyways.

Anyways, that’s all I have to say on Seeking Mansfield by Kate Watson. It is definitely a retelling worth reading! Side-note: I’ve been reading so many retellings lately, but I really love it when they’re well done with a bit of something new! Has anyone else been reading any great retellings? Feel free to share them in the Comments Section below. I would love some recommendations! 😉

Have a nice day, everyone!

–  Sumaya

 

ARC Review: Emergency Contact by Mary H.K. Choi

Summary

From debut author Mary H.K. Choi comes a compulsively readable novel that shows young love in all its awkward glory—perfect for fans of Eleanor & Park and To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.

For Penny Lee high school was a total nonevent. Her friends were okay, her grades were fine, and while she somehow managed to land a boyfriend, he doesn’t actually know anything about her. When Penny heads to college in Austin, Texas, to learn how to become a writer, it’s seventy-nine miles and a zillion light years away from everything she can’t wait to leave behind.

Sam’s stuck. Literally, figuratively, emotionally, financially. He works at a café and sleeps there too, on a mattress on the floor of an empty storage room upstairs. He knows that this is the god-awful chapter of his life that will serve as inspiration for when he’s a famous movie director but right this second the seventeen bucks in his checking account and his dying laptop are really testing him.

When Sam and Penny cross paths it’s less meet-cute and more a collision of unbearable awkwardness. Still, they swap numbers and stay in touch—via text—and soon become digitally inseparable, sharing their deepest anxieties and secret dreams without the humiliating weirdness of having to see each other.

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Review

My rating:

black4

Hi, everyone! I’ve recently finished reading Emergency Contact by Mary H.K. Choi and cannot wait to talk about it! When I saw this on NetGalley, the first thing that drew me in were the Rainbow Rowell references. What can I say? I really liked both Eleanor & Park and Fangirl that those comparisons get me every time! But the second thing that made me really want to read this book was the texting bit! I really like the idea of people getting to know each other more through text, opening themselves up when they wouldn’t have otherwise. So, needless to say, I’m really grateful that my request was approved by NetGalley and the publisher!

Firstly, I really want to say that these characters were great! They really popped in this story, every single one of them! Sometimes, I find that while the main characters are really developed within a story, the secondary characters are either flat or aren’t seen as much, and thus become flatter characters in comparison. And yes, while Penny and Sam take center-stage in this novel, the other characters are given such detailed description that I feel as if I know every character within the book!

But honestly, I did love the dual POVs alternating between Penny and Sam! I think it was seeing how they saw themselves versus how the other person saw themselves that made it really worthwhile! If it was just one POV though, I probably wouldn’t have liked it as much. Especially with Penny constantly berating her looks and personality. It just rubbed me the wrong way. It wouldn’t be once in a while; instead, it would occur in every other chapter. I get the fact that she has such a beautiful mother as well as the fact that girls are taught to monitor their appearance and find themselves lacking is a part of it. But seriously, I wish I could read about a character who was mostly confident in their appearance. They don’t have to be Mary Sue confident about it – I just would love for it not to be a main hang-up sometimes. Sam’s also insecure about his appearance, being really skinny and covering himself with tattoos to compensate, which helps. The great thing, though, about their inner thoughts is that you see that the things that bugged them are loved by the other person. It was the balm that soothed my soul!

I did enjoy reading about Penny’s journey as a writer in school as well as Sam going to community college to study film. Penny’s experience did remind me a lot of Cath’s in Fangirl, so the comparison to it was pretty accurate! I loved seeing her written story develop within the main story, and kind of want to read it in its entirety now! Likewise, it was interesting to see Sam’s process on how he filmed his documentary and I wish that I got to know more about what happens afterwards, in terms what he does with it later…

Well, that’s all I have to say about Emergency Contact by Mary H.K. Choi! For now, at least (I honestly have a whole lot more good things to say 🙂 )! I would definitely recommend this to anyone who’s a fan of Rainbow Rowell or contemporary novels in general! Especially if they’re looking for YA novels with a post-secondary setting! For those of you who are interested, Emergency Contact comes out on March 27th, so save the date! And if you have any thoughts about this novel, feel free to share about them in the Comments Section below!

Have a nice day, everyone!

–  Sumaya

I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

ARC Review: Flight Season by Marie Marquardt

Summary

From Marie Marquardt, the author of Dream Things True and The Radius of Us, comes a story of two teenagers learning what to hold on to, what to let go of, and that sometimes love gets in the way of our plans.

Back when they were still strangers, TJ Carvalho witnessed the only moment in Vivi Flannigan’s life when she lost control entirely. Now, TJ can’t seem to erase that moment from his mind, no matter how hard he tries. Vivi doesn’t remember any of it, but she’s determined to leave it far behind. And she will.

But when Vivi returns home from her first year away at college, her big plans and TJ’s ambition to become a nurse land them both on the heart ward of a university hospital, facing them with a long and painful summer together – three months of glorified babysitting for Ángel, the problem patient on the hall. Sure, Ángel may be suffering from a life-threatening heart infection, but that doesn’t make him any less of a pain.

As it turns out, though, Ángel Solís has a thing or two to teach them about all those big plans, and the incredible moments when love gets in their way.

Written in alternating first person from the perspectives of all three characters, Flight Season is a story about discovering what’s really worth holding onto, learning how to let go of the rest, and that one crazy summer that changes your life forever.

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My rating:

blue4

Hi, everyone! Another day, another book! Today, I’ll be talking about Flight Season: A Novel by Marie Marquardt. Funny thing is that I actually wished for this book from NetGalley, but I didn’t think I would get it! But I’m glad that I did, because Flight Season: A Novel was pretty great!

What exactly drove me to liking it? Maybe it was the amazing main characters that basically made up this story! From Vivi to TJ to Ángel, these characters allow readers to peek into their minds and let us into their lives and struggles. Although, out of the three, I think I prefer Vivi and Ángel over TJ, mainly because he’s really rude for no good reason in the beginning, making things harder than they have to be. But by the end, I kind of understood where he was coming from. But still, I felt as if he was a little harsh in judging Vivi based on one experience. I probably feel that way because I access to Vivi’s POV and know that she didn’t deserve that.

And then there was Ángel. First of all, I was really intrigued by the writing style of his POV. It seemed as if he was aware that there was audience, because he is addressing someone as “you”, and it isn’t any of the characters within the book. At the same time, it could be because he’s lonely, lying in a hospital bed all day, unable to do anything without help. And second, I loved any scene that included Ángel because he was bound to liven it up, not just for Vivi and TJ, but for readers as well! But there were also times where I would feel so teary reading his POV, as well as so mad at all the circumstances leading him there, the injustice of it all. His story ends in an open way, which isn’t always satisfying, but in this case, it works.

Well, that’s all I have to say about Flight Season: A Novel by Marie Marquardt. It was an interesting read that I would recommend to anyone who isn’t afraid of a good cry! Flight Season: A Novel comes out on February 20th, so if you’re interested, you don’t have to wait much longer!

And if you have any thoughts or questions about this book, feel free to share them in the Comments Section below. Thanks for reading!

–  Sumaya

I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

ARC Review: Now a Major Motion Picture by Cori McCarthy

Summary

Fandom and first love collide for Iris on the film set for her grandmother’s famous high-fantasy triology—perfect for readers of Fangirl!

Unlike the rest of the world, Iris doesn’t care about the famous high-fantasy Elementia books written by M. E. Thorne. So it’s just a little annoying that M. E. Thorne is her grandmother—and that Iris has to deal with the trilogy’s crazy fans.

When Iris gets dropped in Ireland for the movie adaptation, she sees her opportunity: if she can shut down production, the Elementia craze won’t grow any bigger, and she can finally have a normal life. Not even the rascally-cute actor Eamon O’Brien can get in her way.

But the crew’s passion is contagious, and as Iris begins to find herself in the very world she has avoided her whole life, she realizes that this movie might just be amazing…

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My rating:

blue4

Hey there, wonderful readers! It’s time for another review, this one being on Now a Major Motion Picture by Cori McCarthy. Now, I remember seeing this title last year and feeling that I really wanted to read it. If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you’re probably aware of my love for books concerning the entertainment industry/ the arts! Musicians, artists, actors, you name it, I’ll read it! Added to that fact that this novel is also pretty fandom-friendly, I was obviously excited for Now a Major Motion Picture before I even got my hands on it!

Firstly, I’ve got to say that I was in love with the world built around the fantasy series within the novel! It was really well done to the point where I wanted to know more about Elementia! As for the world outside Elementia, it was great as well in terms of plot. One moment you think everything’s going okay and the next minute there’s a crisis. And then that crisis is averted only to have another one in its place! But I believe that these problems push the characters into who they become in the end; this was especially the case for Iris, at least.

Then there were the amazing characters of this novel. From bold Shoshanna  to heartthrob Julian and nerdy Eamon, to mischievous Ryder and determined Cate, to our headstrong protagonist, Iris! I really admired the character development Iris went through to become a lighter, happier version of herself compared to the beginning of the novel, when her nickname was Jaded Iris. I did like those moments when people had interacted with her dad, only to tell her, I get why you are the way you are. Because it’s true; her dad basically enforced his worldview on her. Thankfully, it gets better afterwards, but I still thought of the dad as the bad guy, even though he was made into a more complex character with some backstory. I kind of wish I heard more from Iris’ mom, though, or at least about Iris’ mom. I understand why I haven’t heard from her, but still…

Well, that’s all I have to say about Now a Major Motion Picture by Cori McCarthy. It was a pretty quick read that I did enjoy!  I’d recommend this to anyone looking for a good contemporary novel! For those of you who are interested, Now a Major Motion Picture comes out on April 3rd, 2018! And if you have any comments or questions, let me know in the Comments Section below! Have a nice day, everyone!

– Sumaya

I received an advance reader’s copy from Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review.

Review: Fallen Heir by Erin Watt

Summary

These Royals will ruin you.

Easton Royal has it all: looks, money, intelligence. His goal in life is to have as much fun as possible. He never thinks about the consequences because he doesn’t have to.

Until Hartley Wright appears, shaking up his easy life. She’s the one girl who’s said no, despite being attracted to him. Easton can’t figure her out and that makes her all the more irresistible.

Hartley doesn’t want him. She says he needs to grow up.

She might be right.

Rivals. Rules. Regrets. For the first time in Easton’s life, wearing a Royal crown isn’t enough. He’s about to learn that the higher you start, the harder you fall.

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My rating:

purple2.5

Hey there, fellow readers! I just finished reading Fallen Heir by Erin Watt and wanted to share some of my thoughts on it! After reading When It’s Real, I couldn’t wait to read Fallen Heir as soon as possible and get my Erin Watt fix! Sadly, it wasn’t what I had expected…

First of all, I’ve got to hand it to the author in terms of plot. That was set up pretty nicely. There was always something to be anxious about and made you want to keep reading, like Hartley’s past or Felicity playing the game. The story was filled with so much drama, which is what I loved about the previous books within the series as well. Plus that strong cliffhanger ending? That’s probably now the main reason for me wanting to read Cracked Kingdom, the next book in the series! So when it came to the plot, I wasn’t disappointed in the slightest!

However, I was disappointed by the array of characters within the novel. Easton wasn’t really easy to read as the protagonist. Now, I know that not every action a character makes has to sit well with you; they’re meant to depict realistic reactions. It was just that a lot of the things he did didn’t sit well with me. Paired with the fact that he didn’t seem to develop much, other than a few epiphanies that seemed to be forgotten after a couple of chapters, Easton’s POV wasn’t all too enjoyable to read. And don’t even get me started on the novel’s romantic pairing! Let’s just say I wouldn’t root for them. Harsh, but true. As for the other characters, there were a few that I liked, but no one that really stood out, other than perhaps Felicity. Even though she was a real mean girl through and through, I did admire how much thought she put into her conniving schemes, which is more than I could say for Easton…

Well, that’s all I have to say about Fallen Heir. It wasn’t as enjoyable as I had hoped, but I did like the story structure, if anything. I don’t know whether or not I’ll read Cracked Kingdom at this point. Maybe Easton will clean up his act, and he’ll start to think of others beyond himself. All I hope for is that there might be another book after Cracked Kingdom so that his development ins’t too rushed to be unbelievable in the hopes of tying loose ends. Either that or, if Cracked Kingdom is the last book, he begins to develop and change some of his ways right at the end, leaving readers the promise of his future character development. Anyways, with that being said, has anyone else read Fallen Heir? And what were your thoughts on it if you did? Let me know in the Comments Section below! Thanks for reading!

–  Sumaya

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