Search

Sue's Reading Corner

where YA books are reviewed

Tag

Sci-Fi Ya

Blog Tour: True Born Trilogy by L.E. Sterling (True Born Review)

About the Book

True Born by L.E. Sterling

Published on May 3rd, 2016

Published by Entangled Teen

Genre: YA Fantasy/Science Fiction

Summary:

Welcome to Dominion City.

After the great Plague descended, the world population was decimated…and their genetics damaged beyond repair.

The Lasters wait hopelessly for their genes to self-destruct. The Splicers pay for expensive treatments that might prolong their life. The plague-resistant True Borns are as mysterious as they are feared…

And then there’s Lucy Fox and her identical twin sister, Margot. After endless tests, no one wants to reveal what they are.

When Margot disappears, a desperate Lucy has no choice but to put her faith in the True Borns, led by the charismatic Nolan Storm and the beautiful but deadly Jared Price. As Lucy and the True Borns set out to rescue her sister, they stumble upon a vast conspiracy stretching from Dominion’s street preachers to shady Russian tycoons. But why target the Fox sisters?

As they say in Dominion, it’s in the blood. 

add-to-goodreads-button

Purchase from the publisher’s site

Review

My rating: purple3

Hi again! Hope everyone is having a good week so far! In honour of the latest instalment of the True Born trilogy, True North, I’m here to review the first book itself! I’ve just finished reading True Born by L.E. Sterling, and even though I liked it overall, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I thought I would. It actually took me a while to finish it compared to most books I read, so maybe it had to do with that. However, I think my view of the characters and the way the exposition was handled had a lot to do with me liking the novel as well.

For instance, other than a handful of characters, I don’t think that anyone made a great impression on me throughout the novel. And that even includes our protagonist, Lucy. At times, I barely tolerated her, but there were a few moments where she caught my attention. Other than that, I also had a problem with her speech patterns because it was all over the place. Sometimes, Lucy would go from using prim and proper speech to talking regularly or in slang. And this isn’t just to different people, but in her thoughts as well. If she had stuck to one lane or the other, it would have been okay with me. But the mix in her dialogue and narrative was a bit jarring to read.

As for the exposition, while I know it’s needed for readers to gain context of the story’s world, at times it could be a bit too much, dumping information when readers could have been eased in. It felt odd at times, too, even random at one point. It’s probably why I was so slow reading this book in the beginning, because by the end of the novel, it was more fast-paced and easier to read.

The thing I liked about this book though was its world building. While the exposition surrounding Lucy and her sister Margot’s history wasn’t the greatest, the mythology surrounding the city of Dominion with a mix of science and magic was really cool. I liked seeing how that all fit together. That and learning about the Fox sisters’ puzzling DNA mystery was what made this book easier to read. It kept me going, wanting to know what would happen to them as well as what was happening to them. Overall, the book’s world building slightly redeemed the story, in my eyes.

Well, that’s all I have to say about True Born by L.E. Sterling. While I’ve got to admit that it wasn’t my favourites, it did hold an interesting appeal in terms of the world created between those pages. Hopefully this just sets the stage for book two! 😉 If you have any thoughts or questions about this book, feel free to share them in the Comments Section below. Thanks for reading, everybody!

–  Sumaya

About the Author

I was a voracious devotee of sci-fi and fantasy novels all through my childhood, so I suppose it doesn’t come as much of a shock that I’ve returned to the genre with a vengeance.

For a while I turned my back on the genre in favour of ‘high-brow’ literary texts. Ironically, it was my doctoral degree that saw me circling back. There’s something about the way postmodern literature plays with the arcane that had me utterly fascinated, and it wasn’t long until I fell headlong back into my old ways and haven’t looked back since.

My first novel, which isn’t in the Urban Fantasy or Fantasy genres, isn’t high literature, mind you, even if it tangles with some serious statements about politics and the way our western world runs. My editor described it as something between Charles Dickens and The Catcher in the Rye: Serious Fun, in other words.

My second novel, Pluto’s Gate, is where I’ve come home to myself: it’s a contemporary retelling of the Demeter-Persephone-Pluto story from Greek mythology. Folded into the mix is a Shaman-in-training, a magical book, Underworld Gods, a world covered in ice, a three-headed dog, and one lousy ex-boyfriend.

But I’ll tell you this much: I believe in the power of words and stories to transform our inner worlds. Whether the characters be vampires or vagabonds, a good narrative sucker punches so-called reality anyhow.

Author links: Website|Goodreads|Twitter

Excerpt

Read the first 6 chapters HERE

Giveaway
a Rafflecopter giveaway

www.yareads.com

Book Blitz: True North by L.E. Sterling

About the Book:

True Born by L.E. Sterling

Published on May 3rd, 2016

Published by Entangled Teen

Genre: YA Fantasy/Science Fiction

Summary:

Welcome to Dominion City.

After the great Plague descended, the world population was decimated…and their genetics damaged beyond repair.

The Lasters wait hopelessly for their genes to self-destruct. The Splicers pay for expensive treatments that might prolong their life. The plague-resistant True Borns are as mysterious as they are feared…

And then there’s Lucy Fox and her identical twin sister, Margot. After endless tests, no one wants to reveal what they are.

When Margot disappears, a desperate Lucy has no choice but to put her faith in the True Borns, led by the charismatic Nolan Storm and the beautiful but deadly Jared Price. As Lucy and the True Borns set out to rescue her sister, they stumble upon a vast conspiracy stretching from Dominion’s street preachers to shady Russian tycoons. But why target the Fox sisters?

As they say in Dominion, it’s in the blood. 

Add to Goodreads

Purchase from the publisher’s site

True North by L.E. Sterling

Published by Entangled Teen

Published April 4th, 2017

Genre: YA Fantasy/Science Fiction

Summary:

Abandoned by her family in Plague-ridden Dominion City, eighteen-year-old Lucy Fox has no choice but to rely upon the kindness of the True Borns, a renegade group of genetically enhanced humans, to save her twin sister, Margot. But Nolan Storm, their mysterious leader, has his own agenda. When Storm backtracks on his promise to rescue Margot, Lucy takes her fate into her own hands and sets off for Russia with her True Born bodyguard and maybe-something-more, the lethal yet beautiful Jared Price. In Russia, there’s been whispered rumors of Plague Cure.

While Lucy fights her magnetic attraction to Jared, anxious that his loyalty to Storm will hurt her chances of finding her sister, they quickly discover that not all is as it appears…and discovering the secrets contained in the Fox sisters’ blood before they wind up dead is just the beginning.

As they say in Dominion, sometimes it’s not you…it’s your DNA.

Add to Goodreads

Purchase from the publisher’s site

About the Author:

I was a voracious devotee of sci-fi and fantasy novels all through my childhood, so I suppose it doesn’t come as much of a shock that I’ve returned to the genre with a vengeance.

For a while I turned my back on the genre in favour of ‘high-brow’ literary texts. Ironically, it was my doctoral degree that saw me circling back. There’s something about the way postmodern literature plays with the arcane that had me utterly fascinated, and it wasn’t long until I fell headlong back into my old ways and haven’t looked back since.

My first novel, which isn’t in the Urban Fantasy or Fantasy genres, isn’t high literature, mind you, even if it tangles with some serious statements about politics and the way our western world runs. My editor described it as something between Charles Dickens and The Catcher in the Rye: Serious Fun, in other words.

My second novel, Pluto’s Gate, is where I’ve come home to myself: it’s a contemporary retelling of the Demeter-Persephone-Pluto story from Greek mythology. Folded into the mix is a Shaman-in-training, a magical book, Underworld Gods, a world covered in ice, a three-headed dog, and one lousy ex-boyfriend.

But I’ll tell you this much: I believe in the power of words and stories to transform our inner worlds. Whether the characters be vampires or vagabonds, a good narrative sucker punches so-called reality anyhow.

Author links: Website|Goodreads|Twitter

Excerpt: 

Read the first 6 chapters HERE

Giveaway:
a Rafflecopter giveaway

www.yareads.com

Review: Shadows and Dreams by Matthew Cody (ReMade 1.1)

My rating: blue4-copy

(3.75 stars)

This story was provided by the publisher for an honest review. 

Hello, everyone! Today, I’ll be talking about the YA serialization up on Serial Box called ReMade, particularly the first instalment, Shadows and Dreams. ReMade is an upcoming serialization spanning from September to December and written in collaboration by Matthew Cody, Kiersten White, E.C. Meyers, Andrea Phillips, Carrie Harris and Gwenda Bond. The story is about twenty-three teenagers that have died at a certain time (between 9:31 pm and 9:32 pm) and ending up in a post-apocalyptic world, where they are humanity’s only hope for survival. Together, they’ll have to search for the answers of what happened to them and the rest of humanity. This first episode, as they are called by Serial Box, is called Shadows and Dreams and is written by Matthew Cody. It focuses on the perspective of a boy named Holden, one of the twenty-three teenagers in the post-apocalyptic world.

What I liked about the episode was its pacing. There was never really a dull moment in the book, which I appreciated very much. But I think that is also why it failed to add more information on what happened to Holden and Seya, the girl he is with at the time. As a reader, I don’t need to be spoon fed everything about the world of the book from the first page, but I like to know a bit about what was going on. I felt as if I had a lot of unanswered questions that could have been reasonably answered in that episode without giving the storyline away, like what were they doing there, the characters involved with Holden and Seya, the place they were in and where it came from. Maybe a lot of it had to do with survival and the fact that most people would be worried about their life over information that might not be necessary in the long run if they slow down.I understand that it is a great suspense technique to withhold information, but it still irked me a bit. If I were to rate this episode by itself, I’d give it a 3.5 star rating Instead, I feel the episode deserves a 3.75 star rating because I’m anticipating it to be a stepping stone and that a lot of questions will be answered in the next instalment.

That’s all I have to say about the first instalment of the ReMade serialization. I think it’s a really good start to a story, if you enjoy fast-paced stories that leave you on the edge of your seat and wanting more! I just wouldn’t read it by itself, but probably with the second instalment right after. If you’re interested in more information about the serialization ReMade, click here. Any thoughts or questions you might have are welcome in the Comments Section below as well. Thanks for reading, everybody!

–  Sumaya

Spinning Starlight by R.C Lewis

My rating:purple3

I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Hey everyone! Today, I’m going to give my thoughts on Spinning Starlight by R.C Lewis. Although I haven’t read a sci-fi novel in a while (since Scarlet by Marissa Meyer), I thought it would be interesting, given the description. Then as I started to read, I would get bored. Whether it was the way the writing was set up (because it was really confusing) on the ARC copy from NetGalley, or from the times they would get technical (which would be a lot). It was just so easy to lose interest. The only parts that I could get on board with were the romantic parts, when she talks about her brothers or the flashbacks.

Then there was the writing. It was really weird to read since the sentences wouldn’t go from left to right fully, if that makes any sense. It would stop in the middle only to continue onto the next line. It really confused me, but not as much as the paragraphs. The time jump between them wouldn’t have a proper transition, which would end up with me thinking something else was going on.

The characters weren’t that interesting to me as well with the exception of Liddi. She sounded like someone you wanted to have at your side. She’s resourceful, intelligent and real. The other characters are a different story (no pun intended). She had so many brothers, and I couldn’t tell them apart in behaviour. Even though they probably all have different personalities, they weren’t prevalent throughout most of the novel. I get the fact that they couldn’t really relay themselves when being stuck between two worlds, but even the flashbacks didn’t provide enough information to go on. There’s also the fact that the love interest was a little too bland for my taste. She’s with him because he sees her. What if she finds another boy that will see her? Will she dump him and go for the other? The only character I could say is developed is Liddi; all the other characters have less to go on and appear to be stock characters, like “the boy that can see her” and “the overprotective brother”.

Overall, the book started with promise but then went downhill as I read it. I could be that this wasn’t my favourite genre, because I rarely read science fiction. The plot was a bit too simplistic as well, especially when it came to the villain’s plan. It didn’t seem worth it, in a way. I could DNFed it, but I wanted to see if it would become better as it went along. It did, but only by a little. Spinning Starlight is coming out this fall on October 6th. If you’re still interested after this review, then go for it. But if you’re a fan of sci-fi, then I suggest you don’t. If you have any more questions, please leave them in the comments below. Keep reading!

-Sumaya

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑